Neptium

Just trying to get by and learn.

Tidak ada satu bangsa di-atas muka bumi ini yang dahulu-nya terjajah yang mendapat kemerdekaan tulen, kemerdekaan seratus peratus kerana di-beri orang, melainkan kerana di-tebus dengan darah.

Komunisme akan menang. 🇲🇾

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Joined 2Y ago
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Cake day: Apr 12, 2021

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Really hate how my government and local media is harping about muh debt to GDP ratio and justifying the most uninspiring liberal think tank market policies known to man.

This is what happens when you outsource tertiary education to Western universities.

No wonder we do so well in those “Economic Freedom” indices. Yes keep attracting FDI, that will surely develop our country…maybe in numbers.


A short history lesson:

During the supposed “Labour” leadership of the UK in 1947, they enacted further anti-union laws that effectively destroyed all of the major trade unions - all affiliated with left-wing and communist independence parties - in Malaya. And when the federation of Malaysia was formed in 1948, the UK arrested thousands of communists and labour union leaders through a declaration of a State of Emergency. Concurrently in 1948, in the coloniser’s turf, the NHS was established.

To this day, unions are completely irrelevant in Malaysian politics. We had no general strike since the hartal in 1947 against the aforementioned British laws. A large aspect of the multi-racial and multi-religious, secular labour and liberation movement defanged and subdued.

This gave way to the rise of political Islam that rejected syncretic and sufi principles that were part of our interpretation of Islam (and how it related to our culture).

Of course this isn’t just putting blame on the colonisers. I have to also blame the bourgeois compradors that was tasked to maintain the coloniser’s superstructure and mostly fulfilled that role.

It’s also important to note that a good chunk of the Malayan liberation movements supported reunification of (the area that consists of modern-day) Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore and Indonesia into a single state. This is something that is maybe reserved to history (at least currently) but I personally say is a strong prequisite for a socialist future for Nusantara. However, that is very obviously not wanted by the West - even a capitalist one would counter their aims back then and even now.


Yeah that article is a good example actually. What I find the most disingenous with people invoking “Apartheid” is that they disregard the material conditions of Malaysia in favour of liberal ideals.

Admittedly, the NEP, being designed by the immature Malay-muslim ruling class, is problematic and there are numerous issues. Malaysia would look very different if it followed the principles of China’s SWCC poverty alleviation programme for example, which also notably still maintains affirmative action in education.


I’m writing this sleep deprived but I hope it is coherent enough. This became longer than expected. I am planning to one day consolidate my thoughts on this specific topic even further with some proper writing at an ambiguous later date but as for now, I’ll use the article’s 1st and 3rd axiom as my base, starting with the 3rd which I think will help make it easier understand my points under the 1st axiom.

Finally, “apartheid” , like any theoretical framework that comes from foreign contexts, is in the final analysis extracting the Palestinian cause from the correct historical, political and emotional context of the conflict, to commit the Palestinians to a program and discourse in which the Arab and Islamic depth is neutralized for them.

This is often the immediate issue when liberals (at home and abroad) try to describe Malaysia as Apartheid. They completely ignore the historical context of Malaysia’s development. They would rather virtue-signal to western-minded worshippers about how “racist” the country is (which I don’t necessarily disagee, but that’s a seperate issue).

Even til this day, the Bumiputra are the poorest in the country. Bumiputra being a constitionally defined term, directly translated as ‘indigene’, including Malay-Muslims and Orang Asli (austroasiatic people that settled in West Malaysia), and the Kadazan-Dusun peoples, indigenous natives in East Malaysia of multi-religious composition (mainly Islam, Christianity and local Animist/Indigenous beliefs).

The NEP was prompted by the infamous racial riots of 1969 that saw the burning of Chinese petty bourgeois businesses by the Malay-muslims and (subsequent retaliation of the Chinese owners). This still lead to a majority of the casualties being Chinese, although there were still considerable Malay-muslim deaths. But let me mention it outright: these riots were incited by the ruling party’s (UMNO) Youth group. Some argue that the riots gave pretext for martial law and the NED. I can’t get too much on that now.

Even if the NEP was inherently capitalist or bourgeois, it was still progressive for it’s time. The NED identified a two-prongs approach to solve Malaysia’s issues: “poverty reduction regardless of race” and elimination “of the identification of race with economic function.” This spurred largely indigenous and national industries, coupled with the growth of government-led SOEs. (There is more nuance to this but I I’ll keep it short.)

Although a proper Marxist view of it would be this: it was an attempt made by the postcolonial ruling elite (comprised of the Malay-muslim aristocrats and the electoral support of ethnic-minority bourgeois and petty bourgeois class) to create a Malay-Muslim capitalist class - in a state dominated by British and Chinese capitalists with a largely urbanised (read “capitalist”) immigrant minority and a largely feudal countryside for the natives. A semi-colonial semi-feudal country.

The term “Apartheid” is literally the opposite of what happened in Malaysia. There was no settler-colonial population in Malaysia and if anything, it would have been closer to describe a certain segment of the Chinese population as the “settler” (I’d personally rather not go down that route though). These affirmative action policies, however effective it was in practice, was a reassertion of the natives’ socio-political control of an economy largely dominated by foreign businesses.

This lack of understanding and misappropriation of the term “Apartheid” to Malaysia disregards the very real consequences of colonialism in the British-imposed racial economy hierarchy and critiques certain bumiputra only programmes as somehow equivalent to a colony in which the a White settler population succeeded at partly genociding half the country (west south africa). It is even more ridiculous that these liberals argue that the so-called apartheid policies is why capital flight and brain drain is occuring in Malaysia. What is imperialism? What is neo-colonialism?

First, “apartheid” as an approach that aims to achieve legal condemnation (in the absence of a specific vision of what will happen the next day, if it is realized) of the form, content, and practices of the political entity that “Israel” establishes on the land of Palestine (or some of it) against the Palestinians (or some of them) in Palestine and the lands. It is a theoretical and operational framework monopolized by legal circles or utilitarian groups, without any representation or contribution from the Palestinians of the diaspora camps, where the Palestinian national liberation movement began in the sixties, and the Gaza Strip, which today represents the base of the central engagement of the Palestinians with “Israel”. Now it [ending “apartheid”] is not a political program for any of the popular forces of the Palestinians, and by virtue of its characteristics it cannot be.

So those that argue that Malaysia’s affirmative action programmes are racist, advocates for a means tested neoliberal solution instead. Like we haven’t suffered under a (neo-)liberalisation programme since the 80s. They argue that policy must be “needs” based, but under a capitalist regime just means a further restriction of access to those that need access to these services.

Furthermore it invites foreign (mainly western) chauvinism and virtue-signalling; look at these backwards Malay-muslims! These racist jihadists! They should be like me, an enlightened white-washed western bootlicker. No wonder political Islam is on the rise in this country overtaking a weak, faltering “centrist” ruling class.

Those calling Malaysia apartheid are out of touch of the Malaysian masses. They refuse to organise and build a cross-race and cross-regional coalition to carry out what our true independence and liberation movements fought for. Apartheid to the critics, is arguing that foreign and ethnic minority capitalists should continue dominate the Malaysian economy and that the marhaen (‘destitute peasants’) should shut up and allow it.


Most were family vacations. Some were places I studied/lived in.


Perks of the Malaysian passport in a way. Got visa-free access to like 167 UN member states? Equivalent to a lot of Western passports.

And of course, being part of a labour aristocratic family helps.


This is an amazing article that gave me a lot to think about how “Apartheid” is and was used by petty bourgeois liberals and western observers on the conditions and history of my own country.

Thank you for the share.


Only including ones where I stepped outside the airport:

Asia

  • Singapore
  • Saudi Arabia (Umrah)
  • Oman
  • Qatar
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Malaysia
  • Bahrain
  • Turkey

Europe

  • Turkey (both sides of the Bosporous strait, if you count what is normally considered “Asia” and “Europe”)
  • France
  • Spain
  • Belgium
  • Netherlands
  • United Kingdom
  • Norway
  • Denmark
  • Switzerland

This experience meant I really had only 2 options in my political development, either a “world citizen” neoliberal or an internationalist Marxist.


That’s actually a hilariously apt way to describe it.

Considering the whole point is to act as delegates and have to follow standard “UN speak” (eg. no personal pronouns) really hammers home the larping bit.


I’ve done MUN at the “middle” and “high” school levels (in quotes because we don’t call them that). I am sure that it may as well be different at university, and I am by no means saying you shouldn’t do it - as someone also very socially anxious, taking opportunities for public speaking is always good! - but I want to temper your expectations a little bit.

In my experience, Model UN is for those with petty bourgeois and labour aristocrat inclinations and amount little to actual and insightful discourse.

This may be due to the age of the participants, but Model UN was really nothing more than just a glorified social gathering and CV booster. People are more obsessed with fulfilling their designated country’s caricatures and create ‘drama’ rather than discuss anything meaningfully. This may vary with the size of the event. There are high profile international MUNs, which I expect is taken more seriously.

Again, don’t get me wrong, it’s still a good experience for learning how certain UN bodies work and social skills, but don’t take it too seriously at the same time. Make sure to socialise, as not only will it get really boring, but your anxiety will spike if you never participate in any of the debates, opening speeches or caucuses.

As for the position paper, a good start would be to see how your chosen country voted through key resolutions related to your topic. From your description, it seems like it’s something related to climate change?

I would say at least look at the Kyoto Protocol and Paris Agreement as good starters. It should be noted that a “background guide” is usually given, tailored towards the specific committee and topic you will be under.

To think about it broadly, a position paper gives the context and specific solutions/clauses you would look for in a resolution. That means specifying your own country’s position, the context behind your country’s position and why it affects your country, and as mentioned before, the proposed solutions.

As for countries, smaller/lesser known countries are always a good choice.


If you force decoupling from China, you will instead find yourself decoupled
Although the entire article has full of bangers, the quote below is my favourite. > The program of the "rules based order" is more maximalist than the Cold War. Anglosphere policy elites occupy a narrative-based reality. Their narrative of the necessity of liberal democracy and neoliberal capitalism for all places and all times must be maintained whatever the facts. They are the heroes of an eschatological conflict between light and darkness, good and evil, democracy and totalitarianism. Compromise with their satanized adversary is appeasement and coexistence is a dirty word. The West is the last bastion of ideology, the crusader of a deformed, late liberalism with the right to fashion every society on earth in its own image. The rest of us must either be re-made according to the latest iteration of "values," however inimical or repulsive to tradition, culture and faith, or be marked for expulsion. There is nothing in between. > Good luck forcing this infantile logic on the foreign policies of the most culturally and politically diverse region in the world, with a shared identity constituted by two thousand years of cultural cross-pollination across the trade routes of the Old World. Southeast Asia is constituted by its very in-betweenness with respect to the civilizational poles of Islamic, Indic and Sinic worlds. Today it is what makes ASEAN central to the multilateral architecture of East Asia, the crossroads of an "Asian Century" made possible by the rise of China.

To elaborate on the other comment, this quote might be useful:

This is why ASEAN should steer clear of either bandwagoning (i.e., openly and exclusively aligning with a stronger power) or hedging its bets (i.e., playing both sides) via the IPEF – which could well be inimical to the pre-existing RCEP and other areas of strategic cooperation and make joint-development (JD) in the SCS even more difficult to achieve.

Joint development of course, being one of the only well-thought out plans that can actually resolve the SCS dispute. (Which is why the West hates it so much.)

The Western Pacific region or rather the southwestern Pacific is different from the rest of the wider region – with its own perspectives and concerns and vision. Geo-economic linkages and supply-chains don’t necessarily extend to geopolitical/geo-security alliances, at least for ASEAN as a whole. And even (regular and customary) joint-military exercises don’t necessarily translate into concrete military commitments in the form of a Nato-like alliance.

Source.

Which is also why I very much cringe at overly online liberals when they picture ASEAN as nothing but just either a US or China pawn (showcased through their lavishly sadistic WW3 maps), like we can’t assert our own independent politics.


Mainly nonfiction. I find fiction books a bit too daunting personally - I never really know where to start.


I’m glad that the only (white) South Africans I have met IRL were left-wing if not explicitly communists.

Also, somewhat unrelated, but do you have any recommended books/articles for South African history?

I know of the history vaguely, but I am especially interested because there’s some commentators in Malaysia who often describe the (Malaysian) New Economic Policy enacted in the early 1970s as Apartheid.

I disagree - but I personally don’t know much about Apartheid rather than some face-value things and would rather understand it more before refuting such claims.


  • Read more regional histories
  • Finally tackling Capital…
  • Practice coding more
  • Practice my native language more, reach a high school level proficiency by the end of the year, like CEFR B2 atleast.
  • 10,000steps minimum everyday.

I would say finally start organising but due to some personal circumstances, technically it’s illegal for me to do so and I may get deported as a result so I’ll bide my time as of now.


Reminds me of my first ever post on this site.


I remember when he echoed this sentiment I found a lot of with some right-wing circles that christianity lost its self-respect and that unlike christianity, muslims kill people who insult their religion. Something that should be strived for apparently.

I find that the most funniest shit like how out of depth do you have to be?

But of course I know why: he unironically believes euro-fash propaganda.

And the history of Islamism/Political Islam is a history of almost being dead but being resuscitated by the West (directly and indirectly) so he should really support the neoliberal order if he likes Islamism so much.


Yes I read about that too. Qatar, Kuwait Bahrain and UAE has liberalized their visa policies and from what I understand and (some) abolished the Kafala system in the past decade or so. But just because certain laws are abolished, or enacted, it doesn’t mean the issues are necessarily gone or enforced.

Not to mention unionisation is still illegal for all foreign workers even til this day.

I’ll never forgive the global North for propping up these monarchies and basically funding/supporting their existence throughout the past century.


@Aru@lemmygrad.ml.

I hope the ping works? Here’s the “essay” you asked about all those months ago lol.


I have to reiterate that this is just one person’s account. Does that mean that I am without bias? No. Is my assessment 100% accurate? Undoubtedly, there will be mistakes. Therefore I am also planning to write a proper essay with references and sources later. The main thing delaying it is that I have some articles and writings that I would like to read first (not all are explicitly Marxist) and I have a lot of assignments due after New Year’s.

I would also appreciate it if anyone had any recommended writings related to this topic.

Some of the pending readings include:

  • Federici, S. (2004) Caliban and the witch: women, the body and primitive accumulation, Brooklyn: Autonomedia.
  • Massey, D. (1994) Space, place and gender, Cambridge: Polity Press.
  • Bakker, I. (2007) ‘Social Reproduction and the Constitution of a Gendered Political Economy’, New Political Economy, 12 (4), 541–556.

Why did I write this personal account?

The World Cup has passed. There has been lots of mud slinging from the West and the national ruling classes of these countries rejecting their critiques. I want to make it clear that for all intents and purposes, this isn’t a black and white issue. The labour aristocrats in these countries live in their own privileged worlds, whereby the working-class lives in toil of the everyday.

I also have to say, I don’t have any personal stake on this issue. It’s now been years since I lived there. When I was living there, I was part of the labour aristocracy, or at least, my family was/is and I am a male. I do not have first-hand experiences with this issue I’m describing as I was a child in school. In fact, my own personal concerns about this are inherently selfish: I had asked myself, why are most of the so-called ‘unskilled’ labour (fast food workers, cashiers, etc) were female southeast Asians – people that look like me, or like my sisters, or cousins or aunts. It was a pattern imprinted in my young brain that didn’t make sense. Little did I know back then that what I was seeing was a process of racial capitalism and the everlasting consequences of colonialism.

Another reason I wrote this was we must stand against what one local organizer in my country called vulgar geopolitics. As communists we must see the material conditions for what it is. The fact of the matter is, what makes these AGM despotic, is their reliance on stolen surplus from migrant labour. That is a fact of many of these monarchies. We must not make excuses for the exploitation. Yes, many of these countries are shifting away from the petro-dollar, but their entire societies were built by south and southeast Asian labour. We must recognise that. I hope one day the sacrifices the global south working class had to make for the Arabian Gulf skylines will be commemorated and fully recognized.


Labour aristocracy, working class migrant labour and the Arabian Gulf monarchies: my experience.
Very long read ahead. This is a personal account and provides no sources. I stand by everything I say in it. See comment reply for more details. Content warning: abuse and (worker) exploitation. I remember one day, my (white) teacher asked why I don’t really like living in x country [Arabian Gulf Monarchies (AGM)]. Their own privilege made the place seem like the best place to live. Definitely, it is, if you are White and have an inflated salary. Or honestly if you are just not part of the global south working class. The West will hypocritically judge and critique the AGM while at the same time allying with them, not remotely treating them the same way they treat other nations that stand against their hegemony. There are a lot of concerns if some of the West’s claims are true or not. In my experience, they are. We have to look at the societies holistically. In all of them, those especially rich in natural gas or oil, there is a specific section of the populations, mainly natives, but also includes global north and south nationals, that form part of the ruling class. Let’s be specific. There are the obvious monarchs and their royal families themselves, owners of the land in the country. They are the aristocrats and the bourgeoisie. What I want to focus on is the majority of the natives and some of the foreigners, typically western educated, forming part of the labour aristocracy and petty bourgeoisie of these countries. Privileged sections of the working class, either through generous social welfare policies (the natives) or through their “skilled labour” (foreigners), they have salaries even greater than that of the median western income. They are the propagandists of these monarchies. They act like these countries are peaceful and safe. They act like no exploitation occurs (even though you can see it plainly with you eyes if you aren’t blinded by your own class position). They say the West is degenerate and Islamophobic, while at the same time living in the West and studying in their universities. They are hypocrites. All of them. **A personal story** My family lived in a “compound” as we called it, but the proper term is a gated community. My traditional nuclear family made my mother the unpaid social reproductive labourer of the house. In many other households, social reproduction was delegated to southeast Asian 'maids'. I always questioned why the ‘maids’ and ‘servants’ were always SEA women. They were delegated to do all house chores, from grocery shopping to even taking care of the children. I recall the numerous times when I followed my mother for grocery shopping, the maids were handling the grocery shopping and more than one occasion, dealing with the children as well. It was perplexing. My parents were going out one day when suddenly a maid approached them. They were waiting supposedly, as one of my parents said, until they (my parents) specifically came out. She was an Indonesian maid of one of our neighbours. She claimed she was abused. She did not even wear shoes. She said that her employers – our neighbours – abused her and that she doesn’t want to get caught running away. Keep in mind that we are Malaysians. My parents speak Bahasa Malaysia, with effort, it is intelligible to Bahasa Indonesia speakers. I suspect this is why she waited for my parents specifically, as we had a similar cultural background. The lady said that she wants to be taken to the embassy. She has no passport. My parents inclined and accepted her request and drove her to the Indonesian embassy and gave her some money as well. We don’t know what happened to her next. Is this a one-time thing? The more I researched, I realised, no it wasn’t. Liberals clamour ‘they signed up for it!’, ‘they get paid!’, ‘they receive housing!’ and ‘they are isolated incidents!’. How wonderful to live with your boss AND abusers. Truly consensual work to be stripped of your rights to travel back to your home country. Truly consensual to ship people to foreign nations without truly informing them of the work you are forced to do. Keep in mind all the workers that sign up are desperate for income, because they have families. Remittances and all that. That is definitely consensual. The workers should be happy that they are not part of the reserve army of labourers!!! It’s definitely not a systemic result of capitalism, where you can plainly see with your own eyes, well, unless you prefer to choke in your own liberalism. I saw a post online that defended servantry in the Arabian Peninsula. And it made me want to go insane. The post made it sound like delegating social reproduction to desperate global south women, was part of ‘Arab’ culture and that its western imperialism to object it. Opportunists and chauvinists really think that defending their own reactionary cultural practices is an act of anti-imperialism. I for one, actually, unlike my labour aristocratic peers, reject the notion that the AGM are good places to live in. Admittedly, they are – only if you are rich. This is true everywhere, but nowhere else is this bare as day than the AGM.

So the US indeed justified it’s use of chemical defoliants in Viet Nam by it’s use by the British in Malaya.

This was prompted by a comment I made before.

I actually finally had time to watch the lecture I linked in the comment and they showcased a quote from a memo made by the Secretary of State to Kennedy.

I was able to eventually find it here.

The use of defoliant does not violate any rule of international law concerning the conduct of chemical warfare and is an accepted tactic of war. Precedent has been been established by the British during the emergency in Malaya in their use of helicopters for destroying cops by chemical spraying.

I hate anglos so much.



I went on a spiral by reading a report from a free market think tank and then came across some self described “centrist liberal” news site, with their token non-white authors of course.

And they are all so bad. Like not only through their misuse of statistics, but in general, I can’t help but after reading it their very Western, and White, worldview that plagues everything they write.

Not to mention their protestations of “trans ideology”.

The rest are just some funny quotes I like to share with you all.

It’s time for us all to recognise that China is hostile to the West, and bent on world domination by any means. We need to bite the bullet and be prepared to pay extra for products not made in China.

After reading that, I genuinely burst out into tears. I was expecting something more sadistic, ie. justifying war, but instead it’s the painfully liberal “lets not buy any made in China products”, that broke me.

You make an excellent point, imo. The fear I have for the West is not China, but the so-called progressive movement. It has become detached from reality and, among other things, seeks to silence (aka cancel) its critics and redefine language to suit its own ends. It is attempting to dismantle the freedom of speech you identify as so important. So far, the progressives seem to be winning. Western society so lacks core values it seems incapable, even unwilling, to effectively oppose the progressive nonsense. China’s greatest threat is its own totalitarian ideology, not the West. The West’s greatest threat is its homegrown progressive ideology. I don’t know how we stop the internal rot.

Both taken from the comments of this article, which is funny in on itself.

And of course this amazing quote from this article:

One of the signature aspects of the culture war is the weaponisation of history, particularly by the new, academically-aligned Left. Decolonisation now dominates thinking about university curricula, as well as hiring practice, while museums have embraced its agenda with open arms.

The first sentence already a marvel to read.

Meanwhile, the ongoing return of Benin Bronzes from museums and, most enthusiastically of all, from Cambridge (116 are in the latest planned shipment back to Nigeria) involves an even more naked use of history as a grenade; most reports on the Bronzes’ return don’t even refer to the massacre of the British that preceded the looting, nor the fact that they belonged to slave-traders in the first place.

NOOO not the deaths of colonizers. I’m crying rn.


If you complain about coal power this or that it simply falls on deaf ears because a significant part of the world doesn’t even have stable electricity. Something that affects the day-to-day life of the people. Something that is needed for development.

Electricity outages is felt sometimes in the West, during extraordinary weather events usually, but it is not a constant threat. This is what a lot of westerners struggle to grasp when it comes to environmental issues.

Development unfortunately requires these tough calls, which means succumbing to coal for the short term. Especially in the current political climate. Haphazardly banning certain energy sources, like some environmentalists clamour for, would do the opposite of actually mitigating climate change and would lead to far more harm than good.

Controlled phase outs are needed. China’s plan (NDC) for the past few years (which they reiterated time and time again) was a carbon emissions peak in 2030, and from their current 5 year plan, an espousal for a ‘ecological civilization’, I have high hopes that they’ll achieve their NDC.

But to answer your question: is it fast enough, ie. is their NDC ambitious enough?

According to this site, no it isn’t.

But again, we have to consider, the West still unequally benefits more from the environmental devastation of the global south. See for example, ecological unequal exchange and its role in core-periphery relations.

The burden is not only on global south nations, when western countries must not only fulfill their own NDCs but should also provide the necessary (unconditional) aid and financing to global south nations.


I used to think this way until I lived in the UK lol

(Context being, the UK has lower than average sunshine hours than most of the world, and definitely lower than the places I lived before)


“as many as 60 rising to 90%” of Indian labourers died in British-owned plantations in Malaya (1910s-1930s)
Colonial capitalism moment. Was reading a book chapter this topic so take this post as a daily reminder to hate the Brits. Admittedly, this is the full quote: > Many ‘coolies’ perished in this brutal and coercive colonial capitalist economy due to diseases, largely malaria, poor diet and harsh working conditions for long hours. On some plantations, the mortality rates were huge ‘as many as 60 rising to 90% of the labourer’s died within a year of their arrival’ (Sandhu, 1969: 171). These appalling and deplorable living conditions were prolonged for a long time (Sasidaran, 2012), and the education and medical facilities were far from adequate (Tinker, 1976: 153). But what's interesting was the book mentioned that more than 2million south Indian labourers had arrived into the colony by 1939, but the actual recorded Indian population from census never reached above [700,000](https://www.ehm.my/publications/articles/malayas-early-20th-century-population-change). Although they could have emigrated back, another possibility is well, as mentioned above, they died. Regardless, the population statistics do add up. Book chapter referenced: Selvaratnam V. (2021) ‘Malaysia’s South Indian ‘Coolies’: Legacies of Imperialism, Colonial Capitalism and Racism’ in R. Rasiah, A. Hashim and J.S. Sidhu (eds) Contesting Malaysia’s Integration into the World Economy, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillian, 169-200.


I’d be more distressed if I didn’t know that the global south will stay winning and these racist fucks and their colonial apologists (there were a lot in this thread), can continue crying in a decadent West. [Thread](https://youtube.com/shorts/-c6uYuApQHs?feature=share). I am on my phone so can’t link to the actual comment. But the shorts itself is as good as one would expect from an account named “history revealed”.

Here’s the actual resolution for anyone interested.

Here’s a summary:

Source.

On a slightly seperate note, I really do hate how UN resolutions are phrased, but that may just be me.


And to be fair, they are all westerners. I’ll never ever trust them to depict indigenous, global south histories at any level of accuracy, diginity or respect.

Because in the end, for many of these channels, history is just a hobby for them. It is divorced from their own realities, and as such, they never have to think about the implications of getting shit wrong.


I attended this talk whereby the researcher, working with local Cuban academics to improve living spaces in Cuba, mentioned how in their experience the locals are very much involved in the decision-making process of their local neighbourhood (and politics generally), which I found completely stark to many bourgeois capitalist democracies we have today.

And this assessment seems to be reflected in the video. (Unsurprisingly.)


Yea, in my original comment I should have referred specifically to chemical defoliants akin to Agent Orange and similar.


Good question!

I read this factoid so many times that it didn’t even occur to me to even pinpoint the exact chronological timeline.

I realise now that I wrote way too much for such a simple question. Scroll down to the images for the answer to your question.

Right so I quickly searched online for any sorts of sources. Most of them cite pretty much nothing (ie. some form of circular reasoning) and take it for granted. See for example this.

Other articles, such as this one, which is a very good read to get the jist of the ‘Malayan Emergency’, and this (before anyone mentions it: yes I know this site is NED funded), mentioned a NewScientist article as the source.

Was able to find a subject index at first, but finally got to a secondary source.

But finally, I was able to find a list of primary sources here. A particularly capitalist quote I like to mention from the article is this, in the context of using defoliant for warfare:

The UK chemicals giant ICI saw it, according to the Colonial Office, as ‘a lucrative field for experiment’ (CO, 1953b and 1953c).

I was also able to find an online conference/lecture regarding this topic here (it’s the second one, starting roughly 1hr in), for those interested.

Now for evidence of American inspiration; that I was unable to truly certify. A NYT article reiterated this claim (like the other articles mentioned), but it cites no sources.

But it really isn’t too much of stretch to assume that the Brits and Americans had shared intel over matters such as this. If anyone has any information on this do let me know.

We also have to keep in mind that the British purposefully burnt colonial records through the aptly named Operation Legacy (see also this;290-291 and The Guardian; for something less overly academic) before they finally left, leading to the Malaysia we know today.

In addition, the current Malaysian government doesn’t want to shine a light on to the communist ‘terrorists’, so the effect of ‘trioxone’ and its extent in Malaysia, is still unknown. And perhaps, it may never be known. It is just a sad, practically insignificant note in a vast and bloody battlefield that is history.


A little unknown fact, the first use of chemical warfare was the British fighting the communist ‘insurgency’ right here in Malaysia. It is said that this first use then inspired the Americans to use it in Vietnam.


Malaysia 🤝 Singapore

Disgusting and inhumane drug laws, with just as much systemic disenfranchisement and racism you’d expect.

Let’s see if the newly formed Malaysian government actually fulfil their pledges, and table the bill that would finally abolish the mandatory death penalty.


I have no real answers to that question really.

Surely, it would make sense for those (especially in rural areas) which have not been exposed to different cultures to atleast be weirded out. That is fine. Indeed, it is normal. Reminds me of the time that my grandparents didn’t know what pizza was. Culture shocks exist, like I was shocked on how drinking is part and parcel to many European cultures.

It leans onto racism, for me, once it becomes patronising and they act like their cultural practices are superior. But I would say the distinction may not particularly be helpful. If anything racism stems from a lack of cultural sensitivity (and also promotes the lack).

I do think that this disdain, apart from the obvious orientalism, is also due to hyper-individualist cultures brought about by capitalism (and perfected) in anglo-western societies especially. The contrast is there, the subservient asiatics versus the freedom-loving westerner.


Thankfully, although Christmas is celebrated in my country, they don’t play any of the music.

What I find funny though is the obviously wintry christmas decorations in a country that never sees temperatures drop below 18C.


In the article I linked they even mentioned how USFDA guidelines said COVID transmission from food is very unlikely.


Cultural sensitivity – there’s a word for it? (A reflective blog)
So this is just a personal reflection of something I found a bit weird. This might just be because of my naivete, but it was baffling. I’d like to preface this by saying, of course I know the history. I know how otherisation works, and how colonial anthropology used to describe non-European cultures, but it never really felt personal. As in, what I face personally in the present day in my everyday life, however it definitely aroused feelings when I read their racist works. That said, I did not expect it to happen in something so trivial. I was in an interview of sorts and mentioned I had lived in multiple countries and come from a multicultural society. The interviewer goes, ‘ah so you have a lot of cultural awareness’. In my head I was like ‘uh, sure’. To me it seemed a bit weird, because having lived in multiple places, having social circles that extended across the entire globe, it felt normal. It was something I didn’t even really think to be special but apparently it is. Not much thought came to it, until now, where I was scrolling through social media (I hate myself every time I do it) and came across a post whose account usually catered to my country’s audience. It blew up, and people from other places saw it. The short depicted of a group of friends setting up a communal meal where instant noodles were prepared in batches and were eaten together using their hands, without any individual plates. They were eating on the floor, using a translucent plastic sufra (borrowing the Arabic term because I am not aware of any local or English equivalent). My thought on the actual shorts were nothing much; it was relatively normal, except maybe eating noodles with hands and having no plates – but some areas in Malaysia do use hands to eat noodles (especially dry noodles) and not using plates was the only ‘weird’ thing, but only a small deviation from the standard. The comments on the other hand, talked about why they are not using utensils, about not using a table, and showed visceral and appalling disgust about the supposed ‘bad’ hygiene, mixed with of course other people (local and non-local) who just saw it as a normal and harmless activity. Because all else considered, that **is** the norm. I really don’t see a problem with it, because we take our shoes off at the entrance of homes, and in that particular video’s context, student hostels, are particular strict about bringing 'equipment' in (due to energy costs and etc but this write-up isn’t about Malaysian governmental boarding schools). It is very much part of our ‘culture’ to eat on the floor *especially* in communal settings. I have my own fair share of memories eating on the bare floor of a very traditional *rumah kampung*, ‘village house’. Not to mention in the middle east, being invited by family friends for dinner. Plates on the floor, sitting with legs crossed and hands on the plate - par for the course in most Asian* cultures, at least. It is sometimes insane to me that people are not aware of other cultural practices especially regarding something simple as eating food. It really feels alien to them, and they show contempt. Now I understand what they mean by cultural sensitivity but really, that’s just called being respectful and not being a complete ignoramus of other peoples besides your own. Maybe I am expecting too much. Not really sure what forced me to write this whole thing in the first place, but I do hope it was enjoyable enough to read. *I really hate using the word ‘Asian’ in general, but sometimes there is no other word to use. Another note: Quickly searched online for something related to this and found this [article](https://www.theoxfordblue.co.uk/2020/05/11/communal-eating-comparing-cultures-and-controlling-a-crisis/). Funny how even everyday experience can be traced through an interesting amalgamation of history, politics and science.

there will be no democracy in Africa as long as democracy is in crisis in the ostensibly developed countries, which today face the same difficulties as the so-called Third World. In fact, great democratic regressions can currently be observed in the West. One could say that these countries are now themselves on the road toward the “Third World.” Maybe then we can talk to each other as equals.

Amazing response to end the interview with.


Ah I just meant it as “LGBT Westerners (read compradors)”, referring to a specific subsection of westerners that are diaspora and weaponise their country of origin to fuel regime change propaganda.


But structures are bad and they ignore people’s agency and is economistic, deterministic and blah blah blah (insert postmodern lingo here).


We use the idea of an iceberg economy to acknowledge the economic diversity that abounds in this world. The iceberg also allows us to explore interrelationships that cannot be cap-tured by mechanical market feedback loops or the victories and defeats of class struggle. Once we include what is hidden below the waterline— and possibly keeping us afloat as a society—we expand our prospects for taking back the economy. We potentially multiply the opportunities for ethical actions.

This is what they say.

I was also confused when I first saw the figure but I reserved judgment before reading the actual book. Now after reading the first chapter… my initial confusion and hatred is justified.

When I was reading the chapter I was in such disbelief that they really used an example of changing consumerist practices and unionisation as ‘ethical’ actions that can ‘change’ the economy with regards to fast fashion and gendered (unpaid) labour exploitation.

Edit: Clarity.


This is how I saved the image. ![](https://lemmygrad.ml/pictrs/image/05ea5937-f5f5-402e-87cd-6d06e51947d4.png) Source: [Chapter 1 of Take Back the Economy](https://libgen.fun/book/index.php?md5=0D9DE77E7F3E2821A64DB4C5A4CD6E9F) (Warning: Terminal Liberalism) Edit: To be fair, it may be more accurate to describe it as a Postmodern feminist book.

I've been bombarded by these type of posts on social media because of the upcoming GE15 happening in Malaysia. And in this country, we were effectively a one-party state for most of our independence so it's really genuinely funny that people justify voting. Our voter turnout is relatively high - more than 70% for most of our elections and the last 2, more than 80%. The people voted for the opposing coalition in the last election and yet in the end the original ruling party came to power again due to MPs party hopping, which lead to continuous changing of PMs (like what's happening in the UK lol) and finally led to a GE, when a majority of the population is struggling with the post-covid economic slowdown, urbanization, climate change and management induced floods. The 'centre-left' (more like centrist at best) coalition being useless as ever and not truly catering for the entirety of the Malaysian population. They talk about 'diversity' or whatever but they mainly represent the interests of the urban liberals. Bourgeois liberal democracy moment. Also the post over-dosing on capitalist-realism, in which it clearly sees the failures of our government and yet is still stuck in the liberal activist cage (a terminal condition that causes all logical activities in the brain to cease).

yes, i am flexing 😎 [Website](https://www.geoguessr.com/seterra/en/vgp/3199). "Only" took 30minutes of practicing the regions I suck at (Central Asia/America, the Carribean, Oceania and Africa) and... another 2hrs of tries. RIP to this run though. Accidentally clicked the US when I was aiming for Canada (it was mid-way and I just carried on with the run to see the time taken).... ![](https://lemmygrad.ml/pictrs/image/5cef9ed2-aead-4ba4-a16a-d3cf338de6d5.png) Meanwhile my first attempt (I have played this site before so not truly a first attempt per se): ![](https://lemmygrad.ml/pictrs/image/54f810db-2281-4bfb-83f4-081526c00b41.png) But to be somewhat serious, being able to generally know the area of a certain country or nation helped me a lot with reading in general ie. current day news and also historical/political books and articles and especially geopolitics. But I do realise that many people just can't do the same. If anything, knowing general regions and sub-continents is already enough. Also, I used to play EU4 a lot and would just stare at the map sometimes so that definitely helped.

Why doesn’t everyone use bidets?
Like why? Sometimes I forget that I’m living in a country where bidets aren’t widespread and I enter a public bathroom and I’m like… bruh And yet somehow we are portrayed as the savages smh

Or 👏 decolonise 👏 MI6. I also get Royal Navy and RAF ads of a similar vein on gaming-related content I watch. These ads seem to intentionally target (admittedly impressionable) young adult males despite their rainbow taint. But it does also imply that they have some issues with recruitment, having to result to this.

Set in a feudalistic fictional world, the song espouses a liberal (to use the term a bit anachronistically) feminist form of class collaborationism. Although both expresses ill-feelings toward the heteronormative patriarchy that they live in, the film tries to make a false equivalence between both of their lives just because of their gender. Erika exhibits false consciousness believing that a princess has the same experiences as her, an indentured servant whose forced to work due to her parent’s debts. This is clearly shown in the first few lines of the song, where Erika had to manually toil away in hard day’s work to even feed herself and yet brushes it off as being ‘used to it’, while Anneliese (the princess) just ‘has to ring a bell’ to have an omelette delivered to her bed. Erika, being kept ignorant by the ruling class, exclaims that they have the same lives. To use Frier’s analysis, it can be seen that Anneliese, although still part of the aristocracy, is denied humanity (agency) not only through her gender but also due to her class as shown by the song’s chorus ‘We carry through to do what we need to do’. Showcasing how everyone is oppressed to some extent in class society.

The TED edutainment industrial complex must be stopped. Contains standard (neo)liberal propaganda so I don't really see the need to 'debunk'. Just watch and laugh.


Politics in this country btw. Too lazy to translate but to summarize the manglish in the daughter's insta story is that she feels 'very' guilty that she can't even do 'usual things'. Couldn't order starbucks because the corrupt prime minister was a 'FOODIE' and 'loved' caramel macchiatos. I wish I was making it up. We really did fail in nation-building by trying to emulate anglo-western modernity. Now we can't escape liberalism (this westernized individualism and also the rising tide of ethno-religious chauvinism).

What’s a word in a language you know that is not directly translatable to English?
The word must be something non-political that is in everyday use or in common speech. For example, in my mother language there's the word *muak*, which describes the feeling you get after eating the same dish repeatedly, leading to you being sick of it and not wanting to eat that dish anymore. Tired (ie. tired of eating the same x dish/food) may be the closest word/phrase in the English language that captures the meaning, but not exactly.

Westerners crying that China helped subsidized their shitty liberal democracies since the 2000s and subsequently probably saved them from an even worse crisis than they are facing now. From [Pew Research Center](https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2022/06/29/negative-views-of-china-tied-to-critical-views-of-its-policies-on-human-rights/). Quoted from [South China Morning Post](https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/politics/article/3186192/why-do-singapore-and-malaysia-have-more-favourable-view-china-us?module=perpetual_scroll_0&pgtype=article&campaign=3186192) (paywalled): > Chong Ja Ian, an associate professor of political science at the National University of Singapore, said populations in Singapore and Malaysia were more “primed towards pliancy to authority” and tended to place more emphasis on economic performance. I really do hate this rhetoric that somehow Malaysia/Singapore values authoritarianism (whatever that means). Liberal politics will never understand how even if the 2 countries are functionally 1 party states and may not be the most socially liberal places in the world, the parties carried and boosted economic performance, making both nations the top 3 in GDP per capita in southeast asia. Personally, they would never get how economic performance has allowed my family to literally escape from poverty and peasant level subsistance farming to clean, modern houses and high-school/university education. Of course they wouldn't understand. Muh liberal values and hooman rights. The West would rather see us fighting for scraps and being unstable and war torn like the Middle East. Fuck them.

cross-posted from: https://lemmygrad.ml/post/345560 > Went and dug a little deeper and it seems that for high-income nations, this trend of more women than men graduating in universities (as well as outperforming in school) has been going on for multiple decades now. > > Apart of me wants to think its just right-wing hysteria because this was brought to my attention by some random podcast clip using this example as somehow proof that patriarchy doesn't exist lol. Some articles I read did mention how other factors (particularly class and race) was a higher determinant of school/university success. > > And I particularly do not like biological explanations anyways (too essentialist to my taste, but I can't say for sure). I forgot which article in particular but it did argue it's because men used to be able find jobs in more traditional blue-collar industries, leading to this present day discrepancy. > > What do you all think?

Went and dug a little deeper and it seems that for high-income nations, this trend of more women than men graduating in universities (as well as outperforming in school) has been going on for multiple decades now. Apart of me wants to think its just right-wing hysteria because this was brought to my attention by some random podcast clip using this example as somehow proof that patriarchy doesn't exist lol. Some articles I read did mention how other factors (particularly class and race) was a higher determinant of school/university success. And I particularly do not like biological explanations anyways (too essentialist to my taste, but I can't say for sure). I forgot which article in particular but it did argue it's because men used to be able find jobs in more traditional blue-collar industries, leading to this present day discrepancy. What do you all think?


Went to a Taco Bell for the first time
I understand the memes now. They opened restaurants here a year back and never got to try until now. Review: Average price for American fast food in this country, that is, more expensive than local restaurants and seem to target the more affluent urban middle-class populace. Worst than ‘proper’ American Tex-Mex restaurants, which is expected; they are pricier. Overall: Not really sure why you would take this over other american fast food options if you crave it, honestly. Unless you are in for the gimmick of it (allegedly) being “”””Mexican”””” food. That said, I would like to try proper mexican food someday. There no real good options here that I know of though.

The internet is a white supremacist, right-wing shithole: A (relatively) short story
I was sent a post on Quora. ![](https://lemmygrad.ml/pictrs/image/20157186-b746-428b-a2d0-878d814558cd.jpeg) This was my reaction to it firstly: I didn’t pay attention to the username and I just read the first paragraph. My mind was already raising alarms. Racist caricatures (filipino’s only eat rice and soy???) and estrogen ???. And creepy question and answer. (Sexual objectification; racism and sexism into one?) After I read the brackets I instantly texted my friend, and I quote, ‘it’s a fucking white supremacist alr account.’ I read the user tag and the use of the word ‘tittays’ and ‘jublies’ sealed the deal. Written by a man with an emotional maturity of a 12 year old. What does the facts say though? The soy – estrogen link has already been discussed a lot, hbomberguy’s video is an entertaining spin on it. I would also like to add that it perpetuates this notion of emasculated Asian males and western fetishism of Asian females. [BMI, weight and diet](https://www.healthline.com/health/average-breast-size), as well as exercise does play a role (see scientific article linked below also). Lets look at the first 2 results that pops up when you search average breast size by country: [Worldpopulationreview.com](https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/breast-size-by-country) and [worlddata.info](https://www.worlddata.info/average-breastsize.php). I’ll focus mainly on worlddata because worldpopulationreview cites worlddata and also another website that says ‘According to the latest surveys’ without any source. Seems legit. Then I found this gem on worlddata, while also not actually listing any links or proper sources. ![](https://lemmygrad.ml/pictrs/image/cad51c8a-f756-420b-b42a-06630276eaa2.png) AH okay so everything you said on the website is completely horseshit and is not based on actual numbers? Good to know. They say this after they tried inferring conclusions from their supposed ‘data’. This was after I found a [scientific article](https://pure.port.ac.uk/ws/portalfiles/portal/3113457/Breasts_are_getting_bigger_where_is_the_evidence.pdf) detailing how using bra-size is completely inaccurate way to measure breast size while also arguing that most surveys are unreliable due to not physically using tools to measure the dimensions. Worlddata acknowledges the faultiness of bra size, which is peculiar (to put it lightly) why they still labelled their overall site page as 'average breast size'. Conclusion The internet is shit. I stopped engaging with overt online political content for months now because I need to preserve my own mental health. I had a conversation with someone who self described as ‘apolitical’ and he said that the internet was not really racist or sexist. I second-guessed myself then because I was like ok maybe I just hang out in the overly political parts of the internet. Yeah no. Every month I encounter something that validates and justifies China’s firewall. The ‘normal’ (anglophone) internet is hell. Sometimes I wish I didn’t know English (maybe the anti-literacy anarchists were onto something 🤔). Kind of insane how after a quick search, everything this comment says is proven to be false. Note: If I got any of the medical facts wrong do tell me. I am not a medical professional.

Copied below. The BRICS countries have backed a Chinese suggestion that the bloc should be expanded, but have not named the candidate countries. A joint statement by the foreign ministers of the bloc – whose other members are Brazil, Russia, India and South Africa – following an online meeting on Thursday supported its first expansion in a decade, but said they needed to clarify relevant guiding principles, standards and procedures. Although no candidate countries have been named, earlier this year Argentine President Alberto Fernández said he wanted his country to join, and analysts have said Indonesia is another likely candidate. Brazil, Russia, India and China initially formed the bloc in 2009, with South Africa joining in 2010. The meeting of five foreign ministers, including Russia’s Sergey Lavrov, was the first since his country invaded Ukraine in February. Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi repeated Beijing’s position calling for peace talks and criticised Western countries for providing arms to Ukraine and imposing sanctions on Russia. “Delivering arms cannot bring peace to Ukraine, and pressure by sanctions cannot solve the European security dilemma,” Wang said, according to a readout from the Chinese foreign ministry. He said China opposes the weaponisation of international economic and financial cooperation and coercing other countries to choose sides. He also called for an effort to reduce the spillover effect of the war, which has hit international trade and food supplies “especially in supporting vulnerable developing countries to tide over the difficulties”. The minister also urged the other BRICS countries to be “independent” and “fair” over Ukraine. Three BRICS members – China, India and South Africa – earlier abstained from voting on a United Nations resolution to condemn Russia for its aggression against Ukraine. The joint statement, with a brief address on the Ukraine issues, said the foreign ministers “supported Russia negotiating with Ukraine” and “discussed concerns over the humanitarian situation in Ukraine and beyond”. Without naming the United States, Wang called on the bloc to resist the creation of “parallel systems” to divide the world. He also said BRICS nations should oppose all kinds of unilateral sanctions and “long-arm jurisdiction”. The 25-point joint statement issued after the meeting included pledges to work together on issues such as global governance, climate change, anti-terrorism, arms control, human rights, and AI technology. China and Russia also expressed support for the three other members playing a greater role in the United Nations. Argentina was among the nine developing countries and emerging economies taking part in a separate meeting with the BRICS countries on Thursday night. Argentina’s ambassador to China, Sabino Vaca Narvaja, said the invitation to take part “was extremely important,” and constituted a step toward “formal entry” into the bloc. The other eight participants were Kazakhstan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Indonesia, Nigeria, Senegal, the United Arab Emirates and Thailand. Jiang Shixue, director of the Centre for Latin American Studies at Shanghai University, said the expansion of BRICS is seen as an “irreversible trend” by many observers. “Facing an increasing attack by the developed countries led by the United States, developing countries and emerging economies should expand our strength to play a bigger role in global governance,” Jiang said. Jiang said China has been making efforts in this direction since the “BRICS Plus” formulation was first mooted in 2017 with the objective of widening the bloc’s “circle of friends”. Xu Hongcai, from the China Association of Policy Science, said the bloc should invite Group of 20 countries with international influence and large economies, such as Indonesia and Argentina. “The G20 is composed of major developed and developing countries, BRICS lacks representation in ignoring other developing nations. It will be a good idea to first select G20 member nations to join the bloc,” Xu said.

Honestly its so gratifying when something you’ve read lines up with what you encounter in the media. Still a gross injustice of course. The way mixed race marriages especially of colonised and coloniser (through their offspring) allowed Europe to exercise greater control of her colonies, acting as a bridge or middleman. Its thoroughly fucked up. Not to mention the racial/ethnic hierarchy that was then embedded in colonial societies across the global south, still present in the modern day. Fortunately, Allah didn’t make me mixed race with the (White) Shaytan. Alhamdullilah. Only got Pure™️ global south genes. But to be serious, this is what happens when you take liberal idpol to its conclusions. You apologize and give prizes to ‘one of the good ones’, in this case the ‘Indo-Europeans’ minority while ignoring and leaving the vast majority of Indonesians, in Indonesia, to suffer. We do not express enough hatred of the Dutch in particular tbh.

cross-posted from: https://lemmygrad.ml/post/236002 > Copy pasted below. Amazing that news such as this is pay-walled. > > For more than 20 years, successive US presidents have given Saudi Arabia a pass on the question of whether the kingdom's government had anything to do with the 9/11 terrorist attacks. As the story goes, plenty of individual Saudis were involved — including 15 of the 19 hijackers and Osama bin Laden — but there was no evidence to indicate that the Saudi government itself was behind the attacks. That's more or less what the 9/11 Commission concluded, and the Saudi government continues to cite the commission's report in official statements as proof that "Saudi Arabia had nothing to do with this terrible crime." > > In its report, the commission took particular pains not to implicate Omar al-Bayoumi, a Saudi national who met two of the 9/11 hijackers in Los Angeles shortly after they arrived in the US. Bayoumi then helped them move to San Diego, where he signed as the guarantor on an apartment they rented. > > Bayoumi has long maintained that he met the hijackers by coincidence, a claim the commission did little to contradict. Instead, it painted a mostly innocuous portrait of Bayoumi's background, concluding that he was in the US "as a business student" and that he worked for the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "I don't believe he was a 'Saudi government agent' working to help terrorists," wrote Philip Zelikow, the 9/11 Commission's executive director, in response to questions from a journalist in 2007. > > But over the past several months, a raft of new documents released by the American and British governments suggest that the 9/11 Commission got it wrong. An FBI memo declassified in March, in response to an executive order by President Joe Biden, reported that Bayoumi was receiving a monthly stipend from Saudi intelligence. In other words, he was not a student but a spy. According to the FBI memo, dated June 14, 2017, Bayoumi was tasked with gathering information "on persons of interest in the Saudi community" and passing the intelligence to Prince Bandar bin Sultan al-Saud, the Saudi ambassador at the time. > > "Allegations of Albayoumi's involvement with Saudi intelligence were not confirmed at the time of the 9/11 Commission Report," writes the memo's author, an FBI special agent at the bureau's Washington field office, whose name is redacted. "The above information confirms those allegations." > > A second declassified FBI memo shows that a confidential source told the FBI there was a "50/50 chance" that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks and "assisted two of the hijackers while residing in San Diego." > > The FBI declined to comment. But the revelations appear to undercut the Saudi government's claims that it had no ties to the 9/11 attacks. While US intelligence agencies have repeatedly concluded that the Saudi government as a whole had no advance knowledge of the 2001 plot, they have flagged specific Saudi agencies and members of the royal family as having ties to Al Qaeda. Last year, newly declassified FBI files complicated another crucial piece of Bayoumi's narrative, suggesting that his initial meeting with the two hijackers had been arranged by contacts at the Saudi Consulate in Los Angeles. > > Zelikow, the executive director of the 9/11 Commission, told Insider he's skeptical that Bayoumi knew about the plot, or that he was working for Saudi intelligence. Many high-ranking Saudis, Zelikow pointed out, were despised by bin Laden and opposed to his efforts. "The information that Bayoumi might have been a paid informant ... if it is true, actually tends to cut the other way," Zelikow said — suggesting that Bayoumi would have been working against the hijackers. > > In an interview with Insider, Thomas Kean, the former New Jersey governor who chaired the 9/11 Commission, acknowledged that Bayoumi "was definitely involved" with the Saudi government. But he remains uncertain about what form that involvement took. "There's no question he was involved with Saudi..." Kean said, and did not complete that sentence before continuing. "It's difficult in Saudi Arabia to decide who's who — whether it's the royal family or Saudi intelligence." Kean also reiterated that the commission found no evidence to suggest that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the attacks. > > But a second raft of documents — released by the British government last week in response to a civil lawsuit against the Saudi government by the families of 9/11 victims — points to the possibility that Bayoumi knew about the attacks before they took place. Among Bayoumi's papers was a diagram depicting a plane descending toward a target on the horizon. Beside the diagram is a formula used to calculate the distance to the target. > A diagram showing a plane descending, beside a mathematical formula. > Among Bayoumi's belongings, British investigators discovered a drawing of a plane descending toward a target — and an equation that an FBI source said was used to calculate "the height of an aircraft necessary to see a target." UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP > > The diagram was seized by British police in late 2001, but its existence wasn't noted until 2007 — three years after the 9/11 commission issued its final report. It's hard to imagine an innocuous explanation for anyone possessing such a diagram shortly before the 9/11 attacks. "Sure looks suspicious — and sinister," said Philip Shenon, author of "The Commission," a history of the 9/11 report, which recounted dissent from some of the commission's staff regarding the extent of Saudi involvement. "Fair to wonder whether it suggests he knew in detail about the 9/11 plot." > > Mark Rossini, a former FBI agent who worked as a liaison to the CIA's bin Laden unit, didn't believe the Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks, which, he said, was limited to a small circle within Al Qaeda. But after reviewing the diagram, he changed his mind. "There's no question that guy was a Saudi agent," Rossini told Insider. "He lied. It's unequivocal." > > Zelikow, for his part, remains skeptical. He suggested that the drawing and calculations might be related to Bayoumi's work with the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "It is possible that someone working in civil aviation might have worked on such equations, for various reasons," he said. > > Bayoumi, who has returned to Saudi Arabia, has given multiple interviews to law enforcement over the years, but the deposition he gave in the civil lawsuit brought by the families of 9/11 victims remains under seal. It's unclear whether he has been asked about the diagram but, it's hard to see how the core question of Saudi involvement in 9/11 can be resolved without a full and credible account of his actions. > > The evidence declassified by the British government also includes videos showing Bayoumi filming himself and his circle during his time in San Diego. One shows him embracing Anwar al-Awlaki, a local imam at the time who had ties to Al Qaeda. Like Bayoumi, Awlaki was close to the hijackers. In 2011, he was killed by a US drone strike in Yemen. A second video shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the two San Diego hijackers, in the kitchen of the apartment that Bayoumi helped him rent. > Still frame from a video showing Khalid al-Mihdhar at a party. > This video still shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the 9/11 hijackers, in the kitchen of an apartment rented for him by Bayoumi. UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP > > The release of these new documents comes at an inconvenient time for the Biden administration. The US wants cheap oil, continued rights for military bases, and a revived nuclear deal with Iran. Saudi Arabia wants to end all discussion of the state-sponsored murder of Jamal Khashoggi and a free hand to pursue its brutal proxy war in Yemen. The last thing either country wants is a renewed debate over the Saudi role in 9/11. "The sad truth is that because of geopolitical issues, especially petroleum, we'll never go after the Saudis or hold them accountable," said Rossini, the former FBI agent. > > For decades, the US has allowed its codependent relationship with the Saudi royal family to circumscribe what was supposed to be an exhaustive 9/11 investigation. The more the loose ends become public, the harder it will be to avoid taking a closer, more complete look at who supported the hijackers, and why. The reason we have new information about Bayoumi's ties to the Saudis, it's worth noting, is because Biden decided to declassify more documents related to 9/11 — a much-needed step toward greater transparency. > > "All of a sudden, all of this information is available," said Karen Greenberg, who directs the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School. "Maybe we're finally coming to a sense as a country that we can look these facts in the face and tell the story of what happened."

Copy pasted below. Amazing that news such as this is pay-walled. For more than 20 years, successive US presidents have given Saudi Arabia a pass on the question of whether the kingdom's government had anything to do with the 9/11 terrorist attacks. As the story goes, plenty of individual Saudis were involved — including 15 of the 19 hijackers and Osama bin Laden — but there was no evidence to indicate that the Saudi government itself was behind the attacks. That's more or less what the 9/11 Commission concluded, and the Saudi government continues to cite the commission's report in official statements as proof that "Saudi Arabia had nothing to do with this terrible crime." In its report, the commission took particular pains not to implicate Omar al-Bayoumi, a Saudi national who met two of the 9/11 hijackers in Los Angeles shortly after they arrived in the US. Bayoumi then helped them move to San Diego, where he signed as the guarantor on an apartment they rented. Bayoumi has long maintained that he met the hijackers by coincidence, a claim the commission did little to contradict. Instead, it painted a mostly innocuous portrait of Bayoumi's background, concluding that he was in the US "as a business student" and that he worked for the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "I don't believe he was a 'Saudi government agent' working to help terrorists," wrote Philip Zelikow, the 9/11 Commission's executive director, in response to questions from a journalist in 2007. But over the past several months, a raft of new documents released by the American and British governments suggest that the 9/11 Commission got it wrong. An FBI memo declassified in March, in response to an executive order by President Joe Biden, reported that Bayoumi was receiving a monthly stipend from Saudi intelligence. In other words, he was not a student but a spy. According to the FBI memo, dated June 14, 2017, Bayoumi was tasked with gathering information "on persons of interest in the Saudi community" and passing the intelligence to Prince Bandar bin Sultan al-Saud, the Saudi ambassador at the time. "Allegations of Albayoumi's involvement with Saudi intelligence were not confirmed at the time of the 9/11 Commission Report," writes the memo's author, an FBI special agent at the bureau's Washington field office, whose name is redacted. "The above information confirms those allegations." A second declassified FBI memo shows that a confidential source told the FBI there was a "50/50 chance" that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks and "assisted two of the hijackers while residing in San Diego." The FBI declined to comment. But the revelations appear to undercut the Saudi government's claims that it had no ties to the 9/11 attacks. While US intelligence agencies have repeatedly concluded that the Saudi government as a whole had no advance knowledge of the 2001 plot, they have flagged specific Saudi agencies and members of the royal family as having ties to Al Qaeda. Last year, newly declassified FBI files complicated another crucial piece of Bayoumi's narrative, suggesting that his initial meeting with the two hijackers had been arranged by contacts at the Saudi Consulate in Los Angeles. Zelikow, the executive director of the 9/11 Commission, told Insider he's skeptical that Bayoumi knew about the plot, or that he was working for Saudi intelligence. Many high-ranking Saudis, Zelikow pointed out, were despised by bin Laden and opposed to his efforts. "The information that Bayoumi might have been a paid informant ... if it is true, actually tends to cut the other way," Zelikow said — suggesting that Bayoumi would have been working against the hijackers. In an interview with Insider, Thomas Kean, the former New Jersey governor who chaired the 9/11 Commission, acknowledged that Bayoumi "was definitely involved" with the Saudi government. But he remains uncertain about what form that involvement took. "There's no question he was involved with Saudi..." Kean said, and did not complete that sentence before continuing. "It's difficult in Saudi Arabia to decide who's who — whether it's the royal family or Saudi intelligence." Kean also reiterated that the commission found no evidence to suggest that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the attacks. But a second raft of documents — released by the British government last week in response to a civil lawsuit against the Saudi government by the families of 9/11 victims — points to the possibility that Bayoumi knew about the attacks before they took place. Among Bayoumi's papers was a diagram depicting a plane descending toward a target on the horizon. Beside the diagram is a formula used to calculate the distance to the target. A diagram showing a plane descending, beside a mathematical formula. Among Bayoumi's belongings, British investigators discovered a drawing of a plane descending toward a target — and an equation that an FBI source said was used to calculate "the height of an aircraft necessary to see a target." UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP The diagram was seized by British police in late 2001, but its existence wasn't noted until 2007 — three years after the 9/11 commission issued its final report. It's hard to imagine an innocuous explanation for anyone possessing such a diagram shortly before the 9/11 attacks. "Sure looks suspicious — and sinister," said Philip Shenon, author of "The Commission," a history of the 9/11 report, which recounted dissent from some of the commission's staff regarding the extent of Saudi involvement. "Fair to wonder whether it suggests he knew in detail about the 9/11 plot." Mark Rossini, a former FBI agent who worked as a liaison to the CIA's bin Laden unit, didn't believe the Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks, which, he said, was limited to a small circle within Al Qaeda. But after reviewing the diagram, he changed his mind. "There's no question that guy was a Saudi agent," Rossini told Insider. "He lied. It's unequivocal." Zelikow, for his part, remains skeptical. He suggested that the drawing and calculations might be related to Bayoumi's work with the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "It is possible that someone working in civil aviation might have worked on such equations, for various reasons," he said. Bayoumi, who has returned to Saudi Arabia, has given multiple interviews to law enforcement over the years, but the deposition he gave in the civil lawsuit brought by the families of 9/11 victims remains under seal. It's unclear whether he has been asked about the diagram but, it's hard to see how the core question of Saudi involvement in 9/11 can be resolved without a full and credible account of his actions. The evidence declassified by the British government also includes videos showing Bayoumi filming himself and his circle during his time in San Diego. One shows him embracing Anwar al-Awlaki, a local imam at the time who had ties to Al Qaeda. Like Bayoumi, Awlaki was close to the hijackers. In 2011, he was killed by a US drone strike in Yemen. A second video shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the two San Diego hijackers, in the kitchen of the apartment that Bayoumi helped him rent. Still frame from a video showing Khalid al-Mihdhar at a party. This video still shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the 9/11 hijackers, in the kitchen of an apartment rented for him by Bayoumi. UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP The release of these new documents comes at an inconvenient time for the Biden administration. The US wants cheap oil, continued rights for military bases, and a revived nuclear deal with Iran. Saudi Arabia wants to end all discussion of the state-sponsored murder of Jamal Khashoggi and a free hand to pursue its brutal proxy war in Yemen. The last thing either country wants is a renewed debate over the Saudi role in 9/11. "The sad truth is that because of geopolitical issues, especially petroleum, we'll never go after the Saudis or hold them accountable," said Rossini, the former FBI agent. For decades, the US has allowed its codependent relationship with the Saudi royal family to circumscribe what was supposed to be an exhaustive 9/11 investigation. The more the loose ends become public, the harder it will be to avoid taking a closer, more complete look at who supported the hijackers, and why. The reason we have new information about Bayoumi's ties to the Saudis, it's worth noting, is because Biden decided to declassify more documents related to 9/11 — a much-needed step toward greater transparency. "All of a sudden, all of this information is available," said Karen Greenberg, who directs the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School. "Maybe we're finally coming to a sense as a country that we can look these facts in the face and tell the story of what happened."

Link to twitter thread [here](https://twitter.com/phagafaga/status/1520788122178662400?s=21&t=LZdiY6_XqxvxxoqXHblvvQ). So today’s been a real stressful day since Eid is tomorrow (technically today its AM right now) and I have an essay due the day after aswell as exams in the few days. I am stressing the hell out on how I can make a coherent argument in my essay dealing with world-systems theory, eurocentrism and use of “networks” and flows in viewing the history of globalisation but reading the twitter thread made me realise, even if I fail at writing anything coherent it will never be as embarassing as any takes anarchist twitter has 💀

[rant] I hate STEM bros so much
A friend (who is studying Engineering) asked my thoughts of [a clip of Joe Rogan](https://youtube.com/shorts/b95Hsfc1VJ4?feature=share) where his guest talks about how everyone can be rich if we just train everyone in STEM and they specifically mention not the social sciences. I wrote like a wall of text trying to explain why it is wrong to my friend but I just need to rant. I wonder why there is this push to STEM, perhaps to make the people not develop the critical thinking and skills required to criticize capitalist hegemony? I know this is like a very crude assessment but honestly what else can it be. This is anecdotal but if you don’t know, currently UK academics (more specifically the University and College Union) has been on strikes on and off for years now due to what they call the four fights: Low pay, Casualisation, Workload and Inequality. And a further one on pensions. I’ve just been asking my friends from different universities and courses if their department participate on the strikes. A picture starts becoming clear: academics and departments that are less politically minded ie. STEM, rarely participate in the strikes but those in Humanities and Social Sciences participate in the strikes. Even in my department which is ‘interdisciplinary’, its mainly those teaching on the ‘political’ side that participate in strikes. It may genuinely be due to much more funding that STEM departments get and hence less need to actually strike but the cause is the same: STEM fields and their practitioners are much more complacent in capitalism. Obviously STEM and STEM education is important, but the separation of academia from working class movements and subsequent promotion of STEM as an individualist ethos in how to change the world is literally an effort in subjugating what would be radical students into a proverbial cog in the machine.

I think the problems with the image is self-explanatory and I just wanted to talk more about the school. There is a lot to say but firstly, I just want to characterize the class character of those in the school. The teachers were mainly white and British, or atleast western educated. The students were 99% non-white, of mainly 'expat' global south families living in the country, me being one of them. Looking at the international level, everyone one in the school is definitely top 10% in terms of income earners. Even the country itself the school is located in is top 10 in GDP per capita. The tuition of the school was about 5x university (national) tuition in my home country. So its honestly unsurprising that they thought this 'display' was okay. Unsurprisingly, aswell, most of my friends and classmates from the school now study in western universities (which also includes me) and also study STEM or law/business/econs or even worse, intrelations/polsci/PPE (thankfully I chose a discipline that I realise now has been influenced heavily by marxist thought and other 'left wing' movements). I just watched a documentary on London's gentrification, and that kinda prompted this post (which would also be my first on this site) since it discussed a temple in south London and its people being evicted because the landlord wanted the space to create a hotel and student accommodation. And that fact made me really accept that most of the international students in western universities genuinely just aspire to become petit-bourgeois and upper-middle class manager types, if not actual CEOs and bourgeoisie. That contribute to the suffering and in this case gentrification of minority working class spaces. That includes myself aswell, of course. So my own university's expression of being 'international' literally means including the larger international bourgeoisie as their students, really. Looking at the tuition rate for international students is enough for that to be self-evident. I really don't want to make this a 'woe is me' post but sometimes I wonder what life would be like if I did not read or was exposed to Marxist (or just left-wing) literature and was just a typical liberal. But at the same time, I would have then been complaining about the individual choices and actions of the school (if I were to even critique the 'display'), so I am thankful for that.