I just got rid of my last Windows computer and switched to Linux full time. I’m forced to use Zoom to attend online lectures at my university and WOW is the Linux client for Zoom terrible compared to Windows. For one, it doesn’t have an option to have the gallery view above the screen share view, only beside it, which wastes screen space. It also forces itself into full screen mode whenever someone starts sharing their screen, AND when I switch it back to windowed mode, it’s not maximized even when it was before. It also launches a blank “join a meeting” window alongside the active meeting every time I click on a meeting from Canvas (my University’s course management system) or switch into a breakout group. Finally, for some reason it forcibly disables KDE’s power management modes whenever it’s active.

Screw you Zoom. Fix your shitty software on Linux!

@redjoker
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28M

Hard agree, they also don’t have certain features enabled when you’re a host, which really screws things royally when you find this out in the middle of cohosting an event and you’re supposed to handle the heavy lifting of moderation

@Lowey@lemmy.ml
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18M

Just use the web version! When you get a zoom link after clicking on the join meeting once, a link will come at the bottom “Open in browser”

@daojones@lemmy.ml
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18M

I use the web version.

@AgreeableLandscape@lemmy.ml
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creator
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8M

How did you get a pre-scheduled Zoom meeting to not immediately tell you to install the app and actually go to the web client? I never even got an option to use the web version.

@jelbana@lemmy.ml
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At the very bottom of the page there’s usually a link that says: “Having issues with Zoom Client? Join from Your Browser”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

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